These 15 Photos of Space From NASA Are Mind-Blowing

NASA continues to blow our minds with photos of the vast unknown corners of space. From far away galaxies to our familiar Man in the Moon, these photos will show you things that are hard to fathom as realistic.

A Different Look at Sunshine

A Different Look at Sunshine

NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory spacecraft is constantly taking photos of the sun, including one of the instruments aboard which takes 57,000 photos each day. On January 19, 2015, the spacecraft took its 100 millionth photo, and it is spectacular.

A Different Look at Sunshine

A Different Look at Sunshine

On the same day, January 19, a mosaic image was also captured. This image shows the sun in multiple wavelengths. Who knew science could be so beautiful, stunning and totally awesome all at the same time?

Say Hello to Our Neighbors

Say Hello to Our Neighbors

NASA released the most detailed panoramic picture from the Hubble Space Telescope of the Andromeda galaxy. When we say detailed, we're not kidding. The image is 411 high-resolution pictures put together to make one full picture that is 3.9 billion pixels in size and takes up 4.3 GB of hard drive space. Note the circular-looking star to the upper right on the mountain as you move to the next photo.

Say Hello to Our Neighbors

Say Hello to Our Neighbors

Do you remember that circular-looking star in the upper right of the last photo? It was actually the Andromeda Galaxy. Is your mind blown? Yeah, ours was, too. This photo is a zoomed-in look at our neighboring galaxy. We told you this photo was super detailed.

Say Hello to Our Neighbors

Say Hello to Our Neighbors

And, finally, this is an even closer look at that last photo. Each of those tiny dots are stars in the Andromeda Galaxy. The more you zoom in, the more stars you see. It is hard to fathom the complexity of these photos, and the sheer number of stars and galaxies out there.

Meet NASA's Curiosity on Mars

Meet NASA's Curiosity on Mars

NASA even does selfies. This photo is of the Curiosity Mars Rover at the 'Mojave' site on Mars. Curiosity is a six-wheeled robot that's been working on Mars for five months while giving us some fascinating images to have a look at the Red Planet.

Meet NASA's Curiosity on Mars

Meet NASA's Curiosity on Mars

Notice in this photo some of the Curiosity's tire tracks. Such a simple and unnoticed sight on Earth, but to think that we are making marks on a planet that is 140,000,000 miles away? Extraordinary.

Meet NASA's Curiosity on Mars

Meet NASA's Curiosity on Mars

This is the first sample-collection hole drilled in a layered mountain on Mars by the Curiosity Mars Rover. We also learned a fun fact about Curiosity. August 5 of each Earth year is said to be Curiosity's birthday, so it sings itself 'Happy Birthday' by using Curiosity's Sample Analysis at Mars instrument--making the correct notes by vibrating at different frequencies.

A Look at the Far Side

A Look at the Far Side

We've all seen the moon. It is a familiar sight, and unless it comes out orange or abnormally large at night, we don't think much of it. But, NASA recently released a look at the moon's far side, also known as the dark side of the moon.

A Look at the Far Side

A Look at the Far Side

They used mapping data from the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter to show the phases of the moon from the other side. NASA explained that the terrain on the far side of the moon is much different. It lacks dark spots, called maria, that we see as the "Man in the Moon" on the near side.

Out for a Spacewalk

Out for a Spacewalk

Here, Flight Engineer Terry Virts and Commander Barry Wilmore took a walk outside the International Space Station. Virts tweeted this photo, saying "Out on the P3 truss. #AstroButch handing me his cable to install on the new antenna. #spacewalk". Tweeting from space? Whoa.

An Edge-On View of Sombrero

An Edge-On View of Sombrero

Getting a photo of a spiral galaxy from its edge is very rare, but when it happens, it provides a spectacular view of the actual shape of it. This photo is of the Sombrero Galaxy edge-on. The galaxy is about 60,000 light-years across, and nearly all the small white dots in this photo are actually other galaxies. Our minds are blown, again.

Taking a Spaceview

Taking a Spaceview

This picture probably just looks like some kind of mold, or close up look at a cell. But, it is actually a picture from the International Space Station. To mark the 100th anniversary of the Rocky Mountain National Park on January 26, 2015, Terry Virts, Flight Engineer, took this photo from the Space Station to show the 'majestic peaks and trails' of the park, as he described.

Celebrating the International Year of Light

Celebrating the International Year of Light

Did you know the year 2015 has been declared the International Year of Light? NASA chose to celebrate the wonders of light by exploring the universe in X-rays--a high-energy form of light. Studying using X-rays will allow scientists to better understand stars and galaxies that produce temperatures of millions of degrees, which produce X-rays.

Celebrating the International Year of Light

Celebrating the International Year of Light

Another X-ray image, this is a photo of a galaxy nicknamed "Whirlpool" (fittingly so). It is a spiral galaxy like our Milky Way but is located about 30 million light-years from Earth. It combines X-ray wavelengths (purple), with ultraviolet (blue), visible light (green) and infrared light (red). And, this combination creates another spectacular image to leave us astounded.

In Conclusion, Wow

In Conclusion, Wow

Incredible, mind blowing, and stonishing. These photos are beautiful, mesmerizing and thought-provoking all at once. They give us just a tiny glimpse of the spectacular things much bigger than our little Earth that are waiting to be discovered out in the vast unknown.